UNT names Elizabeth Murakami Mike Moses Endowed Chair

Elizabeth Murakami, professor and director of programs in Educational Leadership in the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M-San Antonio, has been selected to serve as the Mike Moses Endowed Chair in Educational Leadership in the UNT College of Education. She will begin her role as professor of educational leadership and endowed chair in August. The position was left vacant following the retirement of faculty member Jane Huffman last year.

“It is a distinguished honor to join students, faculty and administrators at UNT in enhancing its visibility as the most significant contributor in the preparation of quality educators,” said Murakami. “The department’s strong generation of research, commitment to students and efforts in joining several national and state organizations in order to deliver the best preparation programs was a big factor in accepting this role.”

Murakami is a distinguished national educator and research fellow, having received national and international recognition for her research contributions. She earned her master’s degree and doctorate in educational administration at Michigan State University. Murakami has been dedicated to the improvement of Texas schools for more than a decade and has numerous published works that include academic journals, book chapters, creative works and edited books.

The endowed chair position was funded by Donald A. Buchholz, a UNT alumnus and member of the UNT Board of Regents. Buchholz also is the founder of Southwest Securities Inc., which established a scholarship endowment to benefit students in UNT's superintendent certification program last year.

The chair position is designed to reward an exceptional faculty member for his or her scholarship. In addition, the funding provides resources to build UNT's educational administration programs and bring increased recognition to the graduate programs in this area. The chair position is named for Mike Moses, who has served as a Texas educator for more than 30 years. Moses was the Commissioner of Education for the state of Texas from 1995 through 1999, deputy chancellor for Systems Operations at the Texas Tech University System from 1999 to 2001 and general superintendent of the Dallas Independent School District from 2001 until 2004. 

Meadows Chair Lecture - Growing Plurilingual in a Multicultural Country

Date: 
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

Matthews Hall 209


Dr. EgéaThe Meadows Chair Lecture Series welcomes Dr. Denise Egéa, Professor Emeritus at Louisiana State University and Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Nazarbayev University, for Growing Plurilingual in a Multicultural Country: The Case of Kazakhstan.

Denise Egéa is Distinguished Professor and Professor Emeritus at Louisiana State University, USA, and Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan. Among other titles, she is a Fellow in the Philosophy of Education Society, a Phi Kappa Phi Scholar, and an Officer in the prestigious French Ordre des Palmes Académiques. Across disciplines and borders, her primary areas of scholarship are philosophy of education and curriculum studies, culture and language studies, and philosophy and methodology of research, with a focus on ethics and on human, cultural, linguistic, and educational rights.

She is currently conducting three major research projects. The first is Education in Central Asia: Growing Pains in “The Land Beyond the River,” to be published by Springer. In a second project, funded by a grant from Nazarbayev University, she focuses on “ancient Kazakhstani philosophers,” “the philosophers of the steppe” (Akyns, storytellers, zhyrau, and bies), to explore what Kazakhstani philosophers can teach education. The third project, inspired by her students, is the topic of this presentation, “growing plurilingual in a multicultural country.”

Meadows Chair Lecture - Adolescent Writers in Offline and Online Worlds

Date: 
Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

Matthews Hall 209

 


 

Dr. Paige WareThe Meadows Chair Lecture Series welcomes Dr. Paige Ware, Chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning at Southern Methodist University, for Conventions and Conversations: Adolescent Writers in Offline and Online Worlds.

Prior to earning her doctorate in Education, Language, Literacy, and Culture at the University of California at Berkeley, Dr. Ware was an English as a Second Language (ESL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher. Fluent in Spanish and German, she was a Fulbright scholar in Germany before moving to Spain, where she taught in a bilingual Spanish-English elementary program.

Her research focuses on the use of multimedia technologies for fostering language and literacy growth among adolescents as well as on the use of Internet-based communication for promoting intercultural awareness through international and domestic online language and culture partnerships. Her research has been funded by a National Academy of Education/Spencer Post-Doctoral Fellowship, by the International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF), and by the Ford Scholars program at SMU. She is also the principal investigator of a Department of Education Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) professional development grant supporting educators in obtaining their ESL supplemental certification.

Teacher Education and Administration earns inaugural equity and diversity award

The University of North Texas’ College of Education’s Department of Teacher Education and Administration earned the inaugural Inclusive Excellence Award from UNT’s Division of Institutional Equity and Diversity.

The award was presented to Jim Laney, department chair, and Miriam Ezzani, Educational Leadership Program coordinator in the department, at the Equity and Diversity Conference last month.

Laney said that several years ago his department recognized the need for professional development and took action. Faculty representatives began pursuing external professional development opportunities to increase their cultural proficiency. They also created a professional development plan for all of their faculty and graduate assistants to become proficient in culturally responsive instruction.

Laney said the $5,000 prize will be used on a faculty retreat at the end of this semester at which they will revise course syllabi as needed to remain culturally responsive. Faculty are also working on identifying a topic and guest speaker for the fall.

“Our efforts are ongoing,” Laney said.

The Division of Institutional Equity and Diversity supports and affirms efforts across the university that demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. The Inclusive Excellence Award was created to recognize units who exemplify these qualities. 

Elizabeth With

Vice President for Student Affairs
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Hurley Administration Bldg 207
Phone: 
940-565-4909
Email: 
Elizabeth.With@unt.edu

Dr. With has served as Vice President for Student Affairs since August 2010, initially serving as the division’s interim vice president beginning in January 2010. She leads the university’s efforts to provide opportunities for students and the campus community to cultivate academic, personal, and professional success and become fully engaged in campus life. Prior to becoming vice president, Dr. With was Associate Vice President for Student Development (the previous name of the division) from 2004-2010 and has previously served in several leadership positions within the division since 1998. Prior to joining UNT in 1996 as Assistant Dean of Students, Dr. With was a Discipline and Leadership Coordinator at the University of Texas at Arlington for three years.

COE doctoral student wins SERA Award

Peter Boedeker, an Educational Psychology doctoral student in UNT’s College of Education, recently won the Southwest Educational Research Association (SERA) Bruce Thompson Outstanding Paper Award. Boedeker’s degree plan focuses on research, measurement and statistics.

Boedeker researches the application of advanced statistical methods in education research, with a particular interest in meta-analysis.

“Meta-analysis is a method of consolidating quantitative findings across related studies in an effort to concisely summarize all of the results,” Boedeker said. “Within meta-analysis there are several different models for estimating the combined effect across studies. Two such models are fixed-effect and random-effects. The random-effects model is most applicable in educational research, and thus my paper focuses on this model. Just as with any model, there are options for how to estimate the parameters. The most common method is the DerSimonian and Laird Method and a less tested method is fully (hierarchical) Bayesian estimation. In the paper, I compare these two estimation techniques in the random-effects meta-analysis model. While the research itself is not focused on a particular education issue, it has implications for how to conduct meta-analysis in education research.”

His award will be presented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference, of which SERA is a regional association.

“Presenting at the national conference is an opportunity to share my findings to a broader audience and converse with experts in various fields of education research,” Boedeker said. “These opportunities are critical in my development as a scholar, and I look forward to taking full advantage of them.”

Boedeker describes the submission process as more of a review than a nomination. He said individuals interested in competing for the award submit a paper to the SERA executive director during the SERA conference. Any member of SERA, including graduate students and university faculty, is eligible to compete. After all papers are reviewed, one paper is selected for the award.

“Developing the idea for the paper and then writing took several months as revision after revision iteratively improved the manuscript,” Boedeker said. “The process was fraught with challenges, but my diligence to communicate effectively the work I had done was rewarded.”

Boedeker will present his paper and discuss his work to other attendees in a special session at the 2017 AERA conference.

 

Rita Hay

Administrative Specialist IV, Counseling and Higher Education
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Contact Info
Office: 
Welch Street Complex 2 100
Phone: 
940-565-2910
Email: 
Rita.Hay@unt.edu

KHPR faculty member earns mentorship award from SHAPE America

Dr. ZhangTao Zhang, an associate professor in the UNT College of Education’s Kinesiology, Health Promotion and Recreation department, has won the 2017 Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award.

“It is my great honor and pleasure to receive the 2017 SHAPE America Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award,” Zhang said. “It is also a great achievement and recognition for our doctoral program in Sport Pedagogy and Motor Behavior.”

Zhang is no stranger to SHAPE America. He won the organization’s Mabel Lee Award in 2013 and has been a Research Fellow since 2012, among other scholarly accomplishments and honors.

Since 2010, Zhang has mentored UNT undergraduate and graduate students who have received approximately 10 state, national and international awards for their research. He has also hosted more than 30 visiting scholars and professors from international universities like the University of Seville, Shanghai University of Sport, East China Normal University, Beijing Sport University and Hunan Normal University.

“My colleagues, international visiting professors/scholars, and undergraduate and graduate students from Pediatric Movement and Physical Activity Laboratory at UNT made a strong contribution to help me win this well-known award from SHAPE America this year,” Zhang said.

In order to be eligible to win the award, one must:

  • Currently be a member of SHAPE America and shall have held such membership for at least three years.
  • Work as a full-time faculty member at an institution of higher education.
  • Be nominated by his/her chair, dean, supervisor, colleagues and/or students

For more information about SHAPE America, visit www.shapeamerica.org.

Message from the dean and college news roundup - Spring 2017

Greetings!

So many exciting things are happening in the UNT College of Education this spring! We’ve just named a new dean, Randy Bomer, and our online graduate education programs were ranked 16th in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. Plus, as always, our faculty, students and alumni are making the college proud with their innovative research and professional accomplishments.

Take Angie Wilson, assistant professor counseling in our Counseling and Higher Education department. Wilson recently won the Robert H. Rencken Emerging Professional Leader Award from the American Counseling Association. The award recognizes a professional who has the potential to become a dedicated leader in the counseling profession. Read more about Wilson at coe.unt.edu.

We’re also very proud of Educational Psychology students Dianna Mullet, Kendal Smith and Janessa Bower, who all won awards at the National Association for Gifted Children conference in November. UNT students have won doctoral-level in-progress research awards three out of the last four years, which is surely a testament to the great work the college is doing in gifted and talented education.

I hope our alumni in the Dallas-Fort Worth area will join us for one of the fun mixers planned this spring by the UNT Alumni Association. Mark your calendars for March 28 in Dallas County, March 30 in Tarrant County, April 4 in Denton County and April 6 in Collin County. Venue info and registration is available at untalumni.com.

Finally, I want to thank our donors and friends for their support of the college in 2016. We awarded more than $245,000 in scholarships to 185 students this year, many of whom would not be able to achieve their educational goals without your help. If you’d like to make a gift, visit www.unt.edu/givenow or contact Keturi Beatty at Keturi.Beatty@unt.edu or 940-891-6860.

Bertina H. Combes, Ph.D.
Interim Dean and Professor

CHE doctoral students receive honors

Two doctoral students in the UNT College of Education's Counseling and Higher Education department recently earned prestigious honors from separate professional organizations.

In Higher Education, Nicholas Fuselier, a member of the American College Personnel Association, has won the ACPA Annuit Coeptis Award – Emerging Professional.

"I'm thrilled to be recognized by ACPA in this way," Fuselier said. "ACPA is my professional home, and it's a real honor to be a recipient of this award. The award has been around since 1979, so I feel incredibly lucky to join the community of recipients who have gone on to do some pretty incredible work in the field of student affairs and higher education."

Fuselier was nominated by a former professor and received letters of support from his colleagues.

According to the ACPA, the award honors five emerging professionals at a dinner that often includes "wide-ranging discussion and exchange about professional issues." The dinner carries on a tradition established by ACPA members Philip A. Tripp and Ursula Delworth, who enjoyed challenging contemporaries and junior colleagues in a spirit of personal and professional sharing, good humor and thoughtful intellectual debate.

Fuselier looks forward to carrying on tradition by joining and learning from the other recipients of this award at the dinner.

In Counseling, Ana Reyes, a doctoral student focused on changing lives in the LGBTQ community, has earned a $20,000 fellowship from the 2017 National Board for Certified Counselors.

The NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) is concerned with meeting the behavioral health needs of all Americans, regardless of language or culture, thereby reducing health disparities and improving overall community health and well-being, according to the NBCC. Fellowships to doctoral counseling students from the NBCC MFP aim to strengthen the infrastructure that engages diverse individuals in counseling and increase the number of professional counselors providing effective, culturally competent services to underserved populations.

"I think that my dedication and passion for working with underserved populations shined through my educational, work, and volunteer history," Reyes said.

She has worked with LGBTQ students, immigrants, refugees, survivors of human trafficking, and youths battling substance abuse. She said that these experiences have crafted her path to gaining this accomplishment.

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