Doctoral Candidate Becomes NASFAA Committee Member

Consuela Mitchell, a COE doctoral candidate completing her Ph.D in Higher Education, is a member of the NASFAA Forward50 Committee.

Mitchell describes the NASFAA (National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators) Forward50 Committee as an organization comprised of forward-thinking campus-leaders. The committee is tasked with developing policy solutions that will help surmount obstacles preventing students from enrolling in, paying for, and graduating from college.

“NASFAA is using the grant funding, provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to facilitate the Higher Education Committee of 50—or "Forward50"— a group comprised of college presidents, enrollment managers, admissions staff, financial aid and bursar leaders, members of governing boards, students, and other leaders from all sectors of postsecondary institutions,” Mitchell said. “During the work, The Forward50 will produce four white papers on specific, pre-identified policy areas related to access, affordability, accountability and transparency. These papers will include practical solutions and recommendations for members of Congress, and will be available to the broader policy community for review and comment prior to finalization.”

Mitchell was chosen out of more than 200 applicants to become a member and officially joined in late 2017.

“I applied to be a part of the Forward50 because I am confident my experience as a scholar-practitioner can add value to any policy recommendations our group develops that will strengthen Title IV programs which so many college students rely on to make a college education affordable,” Mitchell said.

Mitchell became a member of NASFAA in 2005 during her time at SMU (Southern Methodist University) where she was an Assistant Director of Financial Aid. There she found an interest in working with matters that affect students’ financial abilities with regards to entering and staying in college.

“I hope to be a voice to policy recommendations who can speak from first-hand experience as a Pell Grant and Federal Work Study recipient,” Mitchell said. “Serving on this committee will allow me to pay-it-forward as an advocate for current and future students who rely on financial aid to make their college goals possible.”

The NASFAA Forward50 Committee began November 2017 and is expected to conclude in April 2019.

 

Apply to be a student ambassador for the College of Education for 2018-2019!

The purpose of the College of Education (COE) Ambassador Program is to promote and represent the College of Education and the University by assisting the COE Recruiter with outreach, working with the COE development office, and providing leadership and support for all education majors.

Why should I apply to be a COE Ambassador?

How does a $500 stipend per semester sound? In addition to the monetary rewards, COE Ambassadors get to meet new people, share their knowledge and love of UNT and the College of Education as well as help current and prospective students every day! They also build connections throughout campus by working closely with the college's Recruiter and Student Advising Office (SAO), Development and External Relations Office (DERO) and the Dean's Office.

What will the COE Ambassador program do for my future?

Students chosen to be part of this elite group receive valuable training and develop skills in problem solving, team building, interpersonal communication, promoting diversity and public speaking, making them more marketable in today's workforce.

What is being a COE Ambassador all about?

The COE Ambassador program is an amazing opportunity for students who desire to help others and promote the College of Education. We are looking for outgoing, friendly students who possess a genuine love for UNT and the COE, and are willing to provide excellent customer service, recruit new students, and be positive role models. Being a COE Ambassador is a prestigious honor and a unique opportunity for personal and professional growth.

Applications are available through the COE Ambassadors page, and are due April 6, 2018.

For additional information, please contact Renee Foster at (940) 565-4577 or Renee.Foster@unt.edu

 

Seminar for Doctoral Students - Dr. Rob Tierney

Date: 
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:20pm
Location: 
Matthews Hall 112

Dr. Rob Tierney
Global Competition and Universalism in Educational Research, Thinking, and Practice

Professor and former Dean, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia; Honorary Professor and immediate Past Dean, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney; Visiting Distinguished Scholar, Beijing Normal University

Meadows Chair Lecture - Dr. Rob Tierney

Date: 
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Matthews Hall 209

Dr. Rob Tierney
Searching for Epistemological and Educational Multitopia

Professor and former Dean, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia; Honorary Professor and immediate Past Dean, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney; Visiting Distinguished Scholar, Beijing Normal University

Kristin K. Meany-Walen

Assistant Professor, Counseling and Higher Education
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Welch Street Complex 2 120
Phone: 
940-565-2913
Email: 
Kristin.Meany-Walen@unt.edu

I completed my BA in psychology at Upper Iowa University and my MA in Mental Health Counseling at the University of Northern Iowa. In 2007, I earned my PhD from the University of North Texas. Throughout my counseling career, I have counseled children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families. Much of my clinical work has been in agency and school-based mental health. I also operated a part-time private practice where I worked with children and families.

As a counselor educator, I worked as an adjunct faculty member at a number of universities before starting as an assistant professor at the University of Northern Iowa in 2013.  I joined the University of North Texas faculty in 2017, and I am honored to be a part of such an accomplished and motivated team.

My primary professional interest is Adlerian play therapy, which is a popular approach to play therapy and is beginning to develop a body of research that supports its effectiveness with children. To date, my most meaningful professional accomplishment has been publishing the first ever Adlerian play therapy randomized control trial, which set the foundation for recognizing Adlerian play therapy as an evidenced-based treatment.

I am married with six children. We enjoy waterskiing and other outdoor adventures. We waterski on a competitive waterski show team. When I find the time, I enjoy running and doing triathlons. I am extremely proud of the UNT Counseling Program: I believe we nurture the development of outstanding counseling associates and professionals.

Credentials: Iowa Licensed Mental Health Counselor, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor

Teaching Areas: Counseling Adolescents, Group Counseling, Play Therapy

Research Areas: Play Therapy, Wellness in Counseling

Honors/Awards: 2016 University of Northern Iowa Pre-tenured Research Award; 2014 University of Northern Iowa Linda Nebbe Award for Caring and Compassionate Educator; 2009-2010 Chi Sigma Iota Intern/Fellow; 2009 Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Emerging Leader Award; 2009 Rho Kappa Chapter of Chi Sigma Iota Outstanding Supervisor Award.

Glen Nakata

Assistant Dean for Finance & Administration
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 117-D
Phone: 
940-565-2949
Email: 
Glen.Nakata@unt.edu

Daniela Balderas

College Budget Officer
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 117-G
Phone: 
940-891-6849
Email: 
Daniela.Balderas@unt.edu

Lauren Kelly

Senior Lecturer, Educational Psychology
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 322-DA
Phone: 
940-565-3485
Email: 
Lauren.Kelly@unt.edu

UNT’s applied physiology lab has links to Olympics

In a couple of weeks, athletes from around the world will compete in the 2018 Winter Olympics, in hopes of attaining glory for themselves and their countries. Researchers in the Applied Physiology Laboratory at the University of North Texas  are working to help all competitors reach their potential.

The lab, which is part of the UNT College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion and Recreation, is the first Collaborating Center of the International Federation of Sports Medicine (FIMS) in the United States. As a part of FIMS, the lab displays the Olympic Rings. FIMS is the only sports science organization allowed to use the Olympic Rings imagery.

The lab, directed by College of Education associate professor Brian McFarlin, joins a network of 20 international labs seeking to solve problems relevant to global sports science and performance.

“We have developed our research in nutrition, strength and condition and other aspects of human performance to the level that our lab has been recognized by FIMS,” said John Nauright, chair of UNT’s KHPR department.

The lab is researching issues such as anti-doping, clean sport performance and improvements in rehabilitation from injury.

“We are also working with partners to establish a focus on how we turn innovations in sport performance to innovations for well-being across society,” Nauright added. “With the Olympics upon us, we are inspired to greater heights and are working to make the world a better place with better quality of life for all.”

 

— UNT News Service

Pages