Shelly Lane

Senior Director of Development, Development and External Relations
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 117
Phone: 
940-891-6860
Email: 
Shelly.Lane@unt.edu

KHPR Professor Talks Recreation, Event and Sport Management Degree and Research

John Collins, KHPR professor and researcher in the COE, talks about what his students are currently learning with regards to recreation, event and sport management and his research in those fields.

Collins’ says his experience with recreation and facility management comes from growing up in east Tennessee by The Great Smoky Mountains National Park and working for places like the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.

He teaches both undergraduate and graduate students. For example, he is currently teaching an undergraduate level class on facility management. Here he focuses his time on making sure his students have a hands on experience by visiting facilities like the newly opened EPIC recreation center in Grand Prairie, the Texas Motor Speedway, and the Superdome in Frisco.

Collins works with nonprofit, Denton Youth Basketball, to host a 7-week league and tournament with over 600 local area youths. The event is held in the Physical Education Building on UNT Campus. His students manage the league by serving on half-day shifts starting at six-thirty in the morning and ending late in the day. This hands-on practical experience is ideal for providing students with the operational logistics related to facility management.

He prepares this activity for his students so they may complete some of the 400 service hours needed to fulfill the RESM (Recreation, Event, and Sport Management) program degree. Collins describes these 400 service hours as a way for students to test different areas of the RESM industry, almost like a process of elimination, weeding out what the student may dislike.

A relatively recent topic addressed in his facilities class is venue security. Collins teaches his students the procedures and steps needed to be addresses in order to ensure a facility is safe before any sort of event.

His class is just a small piece of all the classes students need to take in order to walk out of UNT with the RESM degree.

“We have 14 courses in all,” Collins said. “We have them take event logistics, budgeting, diversity, risk management and legal aspects, event marketing, data analytics, communications, and facility operations just to name a few. RESM students also have to complete a 12 credit hour internship, which is 40 hours a week completing 480 hours. They have to do a special project in that internship where the internship agency allows them take the lead. A lot of times it’s putting on a youth camp over a weekend or some kind of small event or even a bigger event. They may not see that event come to life due to timing but they will have planned it.”

Collins’ students have gone on to work at recreation, sport and event organizations like the American Airlines Center, Texas Motor Speedway, multiple park and recreation agencies across DFW, FC Dallas, Texas Legends, Frisco RoughRiders, and have participated in managing many concerts, festivals, monster truck rallies, and so forth.

 

Research

Collins says he fell in love with research while completing his Ph. D.

He works with nonprofits like Denton Youth Basketball in order to further his research. Collins works with youth ages six to 12, but also conducts research with university students. Some of his main research topics are self-efficacy, acculturation and the stress affiliated with being an international student, benefits of engaging in events, and how all of this affects self-esteem. Collins works to find answers to questions like:

  • How does being involved in recreation, events and sports help one grow as a person?
  • How does it help one’s self-esteem and perceived confidence?
  • How do sport and recreation events impact ones quality of life?
  •  

“Youth research is hard because you not only have to get consent from the children, but from the parents as well,” Collins said.

He said parents are skeptical of the research, always wondering what questions their children will be asked and what studies will be performed on them.

The studies he conducts are very telling of how recreation, sports and events affect everyday lives.

Collins currently has over fifteen studies published and is collaborating with colleagues to publish more.

Doctoral Candidate Becomes NASFAA Committee Member

Consuela Mitchell, a COE doctoral candidate completing her Ph.D in Higher Education, is a member of the NASFAA Forward50 Committee.

Mitchell describes the NASFAA (National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators) Forward50 Committee as an organization comprised of forward-thinking campus-leaders. The committee is tasked with developing policy solutions that will help surmount obstacles preventing students from enrolling in, paying for, and graduating from college.

“NASFAA is using the grant funding, provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to facilitate the Higher Education Committee of 50—or "Forward50"— a group comprised of college presidents, enrollment managers, admissions staff, financial aid and bursar leaders, members of governing boards, students, and other leaders from all sectors of postsecondary institutions,” Mitchell said. “During the work, The Forward50 will produce four white papers on specific, pre-identified policy areas related to access, affordability, accountability and transparency. These papers will include practical solutions and recommendations for members of Congress, and will be available to the broader policy community for review and comment prior to finalization.”

Mitchell was chosen out of more than 200 applicants to become a member and officially joined in late 2017.

“I applied to be a part of the Forward50 because I am confident my experience as a scholar-practitioner can add value to any policy recommendations our group develops that will strengthen Title IV programs which so many college students rely on to make a college education affordable,” Mitchell said.

Mitchell became a member of NASFAA in 2005 during her time at SMU (Southern Methodist University) where she was an Assistant Director of Financial Aid. There she found an interest in working with matters that affect students’ financial abilities with regards to entering and staying in college.

“I hope to be a voice to policy recommendations who can speak from first-hand experience as a Pell Grant and Federal Work Study recipient,” Mitchell said. “Serving on this committee will allow me to pay-it-forward as an advocate for current and future students who rely on financial aid to make their college goals possible.”

The NASFAA Forward50 Committee began November 2017 and is expected to conclude in April 2019.

 

Apply to be a student ambassador for the College of Education for 2018-2019!

The purpose of the College of Education (COE) Ambassador Program is to promote and represent the College of Education and the University by assisting the COE Recruiter with outreach, working with the COE development office, and providing leadership and support for all education majors.

Why should I apply to be a COE Ambassador?

How does a $500 stipend per semester sound? In addition to the monetary rewards, COE Ambassadors get to meet new people, share their knowledge and love of UNT and the College of Education as well as help current and prospective students every day! They also build connections throughout campus by working closely with the college's Recruiter and Student Advising Office (SAO), Development and External Relations Office (DERO) and the Dean's Office.

What will the COE Ambassador program do for my future?

Students chosen to be part of this elite group receive valuable training and develop skills in problem solving, team building, interpersonal communication, promoting diversity and public speaking, making them more marketable in today's workforce.

What is being a COE Ambassador all about?

The COE Ambassador program is an amazing opportunity for students who desire to help others and promote the College of Education. We are looking for outgoing, friendly students who possess a genuine love for UNT and the COE, and are willing to provide excellent customer service, recruit new students, and be positive role models. Being a COE Ambassador is a prestigious honor and a unique opportunity for personal and professional growth.

Applications are available through the COE Ambassadors page, and are due April 6, 2018.

For additional information, please contact Renee Foster at (940) 565-4577 or Renee.Foster@unt.edu

 

Seminar for Doctoral Students - Dr. Rob Tierney

Date: 
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:20pm
Location: 
Matthews Hall 112

Dr. Rob Tierney
Global Competition and Universalism in Educational Research, Thinking, and Practice

Professor and former Dean, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia; Honorary Professor and immediate Past Dean, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney; Visiting Distinguished Scholar, Beijing Normal University

Meadows Chair Lecture - Dr. Rob Tierney

Date: 
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Matthews Hall 209

Dr. Rob Tierney
Searching for Epistemological and Educational Multitopia

Professor and former Dean, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia; Honorary Professor and immediate Past Dean, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney; Visiting Distinguished Scholar, Beijing Normal University

Kristin K. Meany-Walen

Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Welch Street Complex 2 120
Phone: 
940-565-2913
Email: 
Kristin.Meany-Walen@unt.edu

Glen Nakata

Assistant Dean for Finance & Administration
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 117-D
Phone: 
940-565-2949
Email: 
Glen.Nakata@unt.edu

Daniela Balderas

College Budget Officer
Profile Picture
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 117-G
Phone: 
940-891-6849
Email: 
Daniela.Balderas@unt.edu

Pages