CHE Announcements

Announcements for the CHE Departmental Home Page

Mayra Olivares-Urueta enters NCCHC Leadership Fellows Program

Doctoral Alumna Mayra Olivares-Urueta was selected to join the 2015 class of the National Community College Hispanic Council (NCCHC) Leadership Fellows Program. The program is designed to address the lack of Hispanic leaders in American community colleges.

"Being part of the NCCHC leadership fellows 2015 is an exciting opportunity, especially at a time when the national spotlight is on community colleges. I am invigorated by the national discourse surrounding these important institutions and am proud to be part of a leadership fellowship program which seeks to equip future community college leaders who self-identify as Latino/Latina," said Olivares-Urueta.

The 2015 Leadership Fellows Program recently finished its first seminar. The program will last a year and include topical speakers and group exercises designed to expand leadership abilities, as well as a mentoring component.

The program was established in 1985. Since then, over a quarter of the original Fellows have become community college presidents while many others have taken high-level positions in community colleges.

Olivares-Urueta completed her doctorate in higher education at UNT in 2012. She is currently the director of student development services at Tarrant County College.

More information about the NCCHC Leadership Fellows Program can be found at their website.

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Jessie Laljer, UNT's College of Education Development and External Relations Office
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Retired founder of UNT Center for Play Therapy continuing to further the field

Garry Landreth, retired founder of the UNT Center for Play Therapy, was featured in a story for the Arkansas Online newspaper for his role in pioneering the field of play therapy and his continuing engagement in the field. At a recent workshop at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Arkansas, Landreth – a regents professor emeritus – shared his expertise and helped educate counselors and students on how children will often convey their feelings through play and how play can improve counseling outcomes for children and strengthen parent-child relationships.

Visit the UNT Center for Play Therapy website for more information.

UNT students, faculty and alumni present at NASPA 2015 conference

The following UNT students, faculty and alumni made presentations at the NASPA Annual Conference in New Orleans from March 21-25, 2015. NASPA (Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education) is the major national association for student affairs professionals in higher education, and acts with the mission of promoting the advancement and sustainability of student affairs professions. 

Doctoral candidate Janice Hicks

Doctoral candidate Catherine Olivarez, Masters student Margarita Perez, Doctoral candidate Nydia Sanchez

Top Row (L-R): Masters student Will Willis, Masters student Parker Ellis, Masters alum Austin Chappell

Bottom Row (L-R): Senior Lecturer Dr. Uyen Tran-Parsons, Masters student Corinne French, Doctoral candidate Catherine Olivarez

Janice Hicks, UNT doctoral student - The Psychological Cost of Remedial Education: The Perceptions and Experiences of Summer Bridge Students

This session explored the experiences of students enrolled in a remedial summer program who were initially denied admission to a university.

 

Janice Hicks, UNT doctoral student, and Jason Faulk, UNT Dallas Director of Admissions - Building a Bridge toward College Access, Readiness, and Student Success: Two Colleges, One Goal

The presenters of this session discussed a community college-university partnership focused on improving students' access to college through a remedial summer bridge program.

 

Gwenn Pasco, Director of Advising and Assistant Dean, UNT College of Education, and Michael Haynes, ('09, PhD) Tarleton State University Executive Director of Institutional Research - An Examination of two University Based Guaranteed Tuition Programs Housed in Texas Public Universities That are Designed to Both Contain Costs and Support an Increase Graduation Rates

This panel discussion examined two guaranteed tuition plans implemented at two universities in Texas. The tuition plans (research and master's comprehensive) were compared and contrasted in order to determine if they were reaching their goals and desired outcomes.

 

Amy Fann, Assistant Professor, UNT Department of Counseling and Higher Education, Nydia Sanchez, UNTresearch assistant, Patrick Vasquez, UNT Director of Outreach, Margarita Perez, UNT graduate assistant, Catherine Olivarez, UNT Counseling and Higher Education doctoral student, and Ah Ra Cho, UNT Counseling and Higher Education doctoral student - 'I was thinking about my brother, my father, my mother - how will we do this?': Understanding Latino/a Family Participation in College

This qualitative study explored the experiences of Latino families during students' transition to and through their freshman and sophomore years. The involved research has implications for how student affairs professionals can increase engagement and persistence for Latinos and other underrepresented groups with non-dominant culture family structures.

 

Jamaica Chapple, UNT Dallas Assistant Director of Wellness Services, Jason Wallace, UNT Dallas Assistant Director of New Student Programs, Jennifer Skinner, UNT Dallas Assistant Director of Activities and Organizations, Teresa Espino, UNT Dallas Counseling graduate student - Crisis, Trauma & Resiliency: Holistic Retention & Student Success on a Non-Traditional Campus

This program addressed retention methods for students on a non-traditional campus. Participants were exposed to non-traditional student concerns regarding crisis and trauma and how to address those concerns using evidence-based methods of intervention.

 

Katy Lee Kemp, UNT Health Science Center Director of Student Services - Non-Traditional Education: The Importance of Co-Curricular Activities

This session explained a program which explored the importance of co-curricular activities for non-traditional students. Methods included comparing several developmental and involvement theories to a particular population of college students.

 

Catherine Olivarez, UNT Counseling and Higher Education doctoral student - The State of Latinos in Higher Education in Region III

The purpose for this program and series of snapshots was to provide insight to those seeking more information about the Hispanic community in higher education. The presenters discussed the results of the Region III snapshots, and identified new areas that require further review.

 

Johnny Robinson, UT Arlington Assistant Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life - The Changing of the Guard: The generational transition of the CSAO

Presenters from three different generations discussed practices and changes in the dynamics of leadership that may occur as the baby boomer population retires and vacates the higher education workforce.

Doctoral student awarded Graduate Fellowship Award at TACHE conference

Nydia Sanchez

President of TACHE Mauricio Rodriguez (left), Nydia Sánchez (right)

Higher Education doctoral student Nydia C. Sánchez was awarded the Graduate Fellowship Award at the 40th annual Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education (TACHE) Conference on February 13.

Sánchez was selected for the award, which had only four recipients, for her research and service contributions to the Hispanic community in Texas. As part of the award, she was given a $2,000 stipend which she has stated she intends to use towards her dissertation research. Her dissertation explores how low-income, high achieving, border-town Latina and Latino college students help build academic capital in their homes and local communities.

TACHE is a professional association committed to the improvement of educational and employment opportunities for Hispanics in higher education.

Sánchez currently serves as a research assistant in the Office of the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at UNT. She is a PhD candidate and expects to graduate in May 2016.

Learn more about our higher education programs and apply today.

To learn more about TACHE, visit their website.

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Jessie Laljer, UNT's College of Education Development and External Relations Office
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Cajitas project helps students learn culture through self-examination

Art pieces called "cajitas" were displayed February in the halls of the Mean Green Village Building B by graduate students in the Higher Education program. These works of art were not composed of brush strokes and paints, but they showed the intimacy of individuals and personal cultures captured with boxes and personal items such as photos, awards and pieces of each student's history.

The project centered on self-examination and understanding culture in relation to the students' own lives. Higher Education faculty Amy Fann and Uyen Tran-Parsons assigned the project in their classes on Cultural Pluralism in Higher Education. Their idea was based on the work of Alberto Pulido, professor and department chair of ethnic studies in the college of arts and sciences at the University of San Diego.

Students were asked to create a "cajita" or "sacred box" (literally "small box") to represent aspects of their identity and cultural heritage. The cajita wasn't restricted to being a box, but may have taken any shape the creator felt was appropriate. The project, related discussions and coursework were planned with the idea that each student would bring their own lives and experiences with them as their painter's palette. With the lectures, readings and their own knowledge as their canvas, each student was given the chance to deepen their understanding of culture.

"I loved working on this project," said Brendaliz Castro, one of the students in Fann's class. "It is the first time I participated in an assignment like this, and I think it was a great opportunity for us to think about who we are and what has shaped our lives. It was also very interesting to learn about others through their cajitas."

The College of Education's program in Higher Education promotes human development through education, research and service that advance the profession of, and scholarship in, higher education. Learn more about our Higher Education degrees.



Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Jessie Laljer, UNT's College of Education Development and External Relations Office
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Awards heaped onto UNT's Department of Counseling and Higher Education

It has been a good year so far for the Department of Counseling and Higher Education in the University of North Texas' College of Education. A number of faculty members and students have earned awards from various organizations based on their research and contribution to the community.

The types of awards range from lifetime achievement awards to awards for doctoral research dissertations. The Association for Humanistic Counseling, the American Counseling Association and Chi Sigma Iota, the counseling honor society, were among the organizations that gave the awards.

While the Department of Counseling and Higher Education has been ranked first in Texas and among the top 20 in the nation eleven times by the U.S. News and World Report since the rankings began, the sheer volume of awards won by the department this year speaks to the quality of the program.

Department of Counseling and Higher Education faculty members and students who earned an award or were recognized for their work include:

  • Corinne Boyd, a master's student in higher education, was selected for the Leadership Texas Association of School Boards Class of 2015.

  • Sue Bratton, a counseling professor and director of the Center for Play Therapy, and Deborah Ojiambo, a counseling program doctoral alumna, won the 2015 ASGW Best Group Research Article of the Year from the American Counseling Association.

  • Kara Carnes Holt, a counseling program doctoral graduate from UNT, was awarded the 2015 Best Practice Award from the American Counseling Association. The award recognizes research projects that further the evidence-base for counseling practice.

  • Cynthia Chandler, a counseling professor and director of the Consortium for Animal Assisted Therapy, received the Medical Center of Lewisville's 2015 Frist Humanitarian Award for conducting two hours of animal-assisted therapy voluntarily every Wednesday afternoon at the hospital and for her pioneering work in the field of animal-assisted therapy.

  • Jan Holden, department chair and counseling professor, won the 2015 Gilbert and Kathleen Wrenn Award for a Humanitarian and Caring Person from the American Counseling Association. The award honors an ACA member who gives to others without fanfare or expectation of reward other than the personal satisfaction of seeing other people made happier.

  • Kimberly Lowry, a doctoral graduate in higher education, won third place in the 2015 American Association for Blacks in Higher Education Dissertation of the Year Award competition.

  • Taylor Morgan, a second year master's cohort student in higher education, won the 2015 Southwest Association of College and University Housing Offices Bob Huss Outstanding Graduate Student award.

  • Kristie Opiola, a second year doctoral student in counseling, was named a 2015 Emerging Leader by the Association for Humanistic Counseling and was awarded three research grants totaling just under $20,000.

  • Katie Purswell, a recent doctoral graduate of the counseling program, was also named a 2015 Emerging Leader by the Association for Humanistic Counseling.

  • Dee Ray, a counseling professor and director of the Child and Family Resource Clinic, won the 2015 Humanistic Educator/Supervisor Award from the Association for Humanistic Counseling.

  • Nydia Sanchez, a doctoral student in higher education, won a 2015 Graduate Fellowship Award from the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education.

  • Hallie Sheade, a doctoral student in counseling, received the 2015 Outstanding Practitioner Award from Chi Sigma Iota. She was selected for the award based on her work with veterans and her dissertation on equine-assisted counseling.

  • Hayley Stulmaker, a recent doctoral graduate of the counseling program, was awarded the 2015 Dissertation Award from the Association for Humanistic Counseling.

  • LaKaavia Taylor, a counseling doctoral student and teaching fellow, was selected as a 2015 fellow for the National Board for Certified Counselors Minority Fellowship Program, which will include a stipend of around $20,000.

  • Brittany Wilson, a counseling program doctoral student, was named a 2015 Leadership Fellow and Intern by Chi Sigma Iota.

 

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Pleasemake your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Caleb Downs, UNT University Relations, Communications & Marketing
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Alumni Spotlight: Netreia McNulty McCoy from Higher Education

McNulty McCoyNetreia McNulty McCoy, Ed.D. graduated from UNT's College of Education in August 2014. That same month, she joined The Suder Foundation as Director of Campus Relations and Programming. In this role, McNulty McCoy collaborates with coordinators at seven different universities, including University of Kentucky and Washington State University, to deliver high-impact, supportive programming for first-generation college students.

Tell us a little about yourself and where you are now.

"Right now, I think I'm in a good space in my career. Starting as a first generation college student, then going to UT Dallas, then turning around and going to North Texas to work in student affairs while pursuing on my graduate degrees. All of that has given me the opportunity to see different things, meet different people, travel, and network with the bigwigs. I think that has shaped me. So I can really appreciate every experience I have."

How did your time at UNT prepare you for working in the field of student affairs?

"The relationship with my professors. My professors didn't just teach but gave professional insight that, at first, made me first think 'Oh, I really don't need to know that,' but then it comes up and I realize 'Oh, I did need that...'"

"And the research you do in grad school, it really does help you in student affairs – when someone is like, 'Hey, I want to try this new program, has anyone else done it?' and then you have that research mindset, because you have to think, 'Alright, where do I find this information?'"

Are there any faculty members who played a role in your success?

"This is not because she was my dissertation chair, but I actually love Dr. Barbara Bush. Halfway through my master's program, she asked me, 'So, are you going to get a doctorate?' And I looked at her, 'No, why...no, no, I'm not.' And she challenged me, 'Well, why not?' Just the curiosity of her, throwing that question out and piquing my interest, and in her own way saying, 'I'm not really asking you, I'm telling you you're going to get a doctorate.'"

What challenges did you face while pursuing your degrees?

"Trying to work full time, trying to work with problems that come up, and just remembering that going after the degree is a good thing. Especially in the middle of the degree, you just wonder if it's worth it. It's that mental challenge, telling yourself that the commitment and sacrifices you are making are worth it, and will be worth it in the end."

What advice would you offer to someone seeking a career in your field?

"Make the most of your educational experience and your professional experience. What I mean is those who are in undergrad, figure out what your passion is and what drives you, and make the most of that. If you know that you like student affairs in your junior or senior year, get that experience in orientation, judicial affairs, advising, student programing, whatever experience you can get, then pick a graduate program that works for you."

What inspires you?

"Honestly, the success of others. I worked in student affairs for nine years. And when you start working with students, and you can see them growing from where they are, to where they want to be. From a naïve freshman, to this curious sophomore, to this busy junior, to this graduating senior. And to hear them saying 'Ms. Netreia, I want to do this' and being able to respond, 'Well okay, let's get it done,' is amazing. Even with the hard cases, where I have to answer, 'I know that you say you want to do this, but is this the best decision?' and help them in making that hard decision. It's not about me, it's really about them."

What do you look forward to most about the future?

"I just love to see how new programs are developing, the outreach and the trends that you are seeing in research. Where I am now, going from student affairs to non-profit but still working with education, it's given me a different view. Now I'm looking specifically at first-generation college students, how these students are adapting to campus, the support they need, the parental component that they have, the mentoring component that we have. It's looking at higher education in a way that I never thought I would have the opportunity to do."

Learn about McNulty McCoy's undergraduate academic experience through the Dallas Morning News. The newspaper chronicled her educational journey beginning in 2001 with her freshman year at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Jessie Laljer, UNT's College of Education Development and External Relations Office
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

100% of Higher Education master's students employed soon after graduation

Within three months of receiving their master's degrees in higher education from the College of Education, every 2014 graduate who held a graduate assistant position within UNT's Division of Student Affairs had received a job offer in higher education. This perfect placement rate matches the success of the program's 2013 graduating class. Two of the seven students from the 2014 graduating class received job offers before graduating.

The alumni now serve as academic counselors, coordinators and hall directors at academic institutions across the United States, including Texas Tech University, UT Arlington and Creighton University.

"We are lucky to have outstanding students in our program," said Daniel Chen, associate professor in the department of Counseling and Higher Education and higher education program coordinator. "They study and work very hard. More importantly, they have a passion to serve other students and they use their professional knowledge and experiences to promote college student success. These master's graduates earned their jobs and I, along with all the faculty of the program, are very proud of them."

Graduate assistant positions are available for both master's and doctoral students, and may include acting as a research assistant or teaching undergraduate classes at UNT. The positions provide the students with real-life experience as they work towards their degrees.

"My graduate assistant positions taught me to take charge of situations, effectively communicate with a diverse group of people and continuously seek to make myself and my work better," said Lauren Longino, now the international student programs coordinator at The University of Tennessee. "I loved that my supervisors trusted me with a high level of responsibility and helped me find ways to take what I was learning in classroom and apply it to my job. They were more than just bosses, more like mentors, and I still keep in contact with them today."

Learn more about our higher education programs and apply today.

 

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Pleasemake your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Jessie Laljer, UNT's College of Education Development and External Relations Office
For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Latest issues affecting Texas higher education to be addressed at UNT law conference

Prevention and handling of sexual assault and harassment. The growing student debt crisis. Cyberbullying. And the ongoing Texas legislative session. These topics, as well as other major legal considerations for university and college professionals and attorneys, will be discussed at the Texas Higher Education Law Conference at the University of North Texas.

The conference will be March 30-31 (Monday-Tuesday) at the UNT Gateway Center, located at 801 North Texas Blvd. The event is expected to bring together more than 250 administrative, law enforcement and legal personnel from higher education institutions, with emphasis on best practices for handling issues specific to Texas.

"We try to cover a wide range of topics of interest to the higher education and legal community," said Marc Cutright, associate professor of the Department of Counseling and Higher Education and conference organizer. "Not every session is entirely about law, but they all have legal components."

Regular registration, which ends March 27 (Friday), is $300 per day or $375 for both days. On-site registration is $340 per day or $400 for both days. Registration for UNT students and employees is $122.50 per day or $210 for both days.

To register or for details, visit Texas Higher Education Law Conference website or contact Cutright at Marc.Cutright@unt.edu or 940-369-7875.

About the Higher Education Law Conference
Considered the premier conference on higher education law in Texas, the conference is sponsored by the UNT Higher EducationDevelopment Initiative and the UNT College of Education. Other sponsors are the Independent College and Universities of Texas, North Texas Community College Consortium, The Texas Association of Community Colleges, Texas Association of Community College Student Affairs Administrators, Council of Public University Presidents and Chancellors, The Texas Association of Community College Chief Student Affairs Administrators, The Texas Association of College and University Police Administrators, The Texas Council of Student Services Vice Presidents, UNT Department of Counseling and Higher Education, UNT Higher Education Development Initiative, Texas Association of School Boards and Public Identity, Inc.

 

Give Now

Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Monique Bird, UNT University Relations, Communications & Marketing
For media inquiries,
 please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782
).

New photos: Denton students, community gather thousands of books to help children in Uganda

 Books
 
25 more photos from Uganda on Flickr. Photo by Joshua Hamby
 workers

Left to right: Zoe, Taylor, Emily, Ariana and Lindsay, Denton ISD students who helped gather books for Ugandan children this spring.

 Cutright

Marc Cutright in Africa, where he is currently serving as a Fulbright scholar

Update 3-18-15: Visit Flickr to view new photos of Ugandan children with books collected by Denton ISD students and the UNT community last year. The 4,912 books are being distributed to schools in Uganda.

Students at E.P. Rayzor Elementary School in the Denton Independent School District helped gather thousands of books to be sent to children in Uganda as part of a project started by College of Education Associate Professor Marc Cutright.

"We all appreciate the opportunity to connect," said Abbas Tashakkori, professor and chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at UNT. Tashakkori's daughter, Ariana, and four other Rayzor fifth graders formed a group to coordinate collecting books for Ugandan children, under the supervision of their teacher Tricia Jahnke and Principal Mary Dunlevy. Other students in the project are Taylor McMillan, Emily Langley, Zoe Rutt, and Lindsay Wilson.

Joined by other students, teachers and parents, the five fifth graders gathered more than 2,300 books, nearly half of the 4,800 books gathered by the community.

"The biggest outcome here was that the kids learnt a lot from the activity, connected to children in Uganda and developed leadership skills. As one of the parents, I am grateful for the opportunity," Tashakkori says.

The books have been shipped to Uganda.

"When I began this, it was quite a small project," said Cutright, who was in Uganda for the 2013-2014 academic year as a Fulbright scholar working with universities on the expansion of access to higher education and the enhancement of its quality. "My ambition was to get some books for five kids I know personally, and to perhaps have to pay an extra bag charge after I made a very fast trip to Texas last month. I contacted some colleagues in the College of Education, my friends on Facebook, etc., and asked for a bit of help. Little did I know that they would contact their friends, and their friends their friends."

Cutright found a non-governmental organization to ship the books, which weigh nearly a ton.

"So many people gave books anonymously that I have no idea how many people gave, but I know it ranged from a book or three, to hundreds," he said. "And I know the kids at E.P. Rayzor hit their own libraries, those of friends and relatives, and Dr. Tashakkori tells me that some kids even went door-to-door collecting. And they did this in about a week? Amazing. It is testimony, I think, to the deep yearning of people to help those in need. All that needs to be provided is a tangible means to do so."

 

 

Give Now Strengthen the college. Our noteworthy accomplishments, scholarships and programs are supported by generous donations from friends like you. Please make your gift to the college today or contact Keturi Beatty (940-891-6860) to learn more about giving opportunities. Thank you!

By Ellen Rossetti, UNT University Relations, Communications & Marketing

For media inquiries, please contact Monique Bird (940-369-7782).

Pages