Smita Shukla Mehta

Position/Job Title: 
Associate Professor, Educational Psychology
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Profile Picture: 
Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 316-F
Phone: 
940-369-7168
Email: 
Smita.Mehta@unt.edu
Short Bio: 

I received my doctorate from the University of Oregon. My specialty is in the areas of severe behavior problems, severe disabilities, and inclusive education. My research interests include functional behavioral assessment and positive behavior support for individuals with developmental disabilities, analyzing the effect of teacher behavior on student performance, classroom management and instructional strategies, and inclusive education and support.


Published

Evaluating the effectiveness of video instruction on social and communication skills training for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of the Literature

Shukla-Mehta, S., Miller, T., & Callahan, K. J.

Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 25(1), 23-36. DOI: 10.1177/1088357609352901

 

Published

ABA versus TEACCH: The case for defining and validating comprehensive treatment models in Autism.

Callahan, K. J., Shukla-Mehta, S., Magee, S., & Min, W.

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(1), 74-88. DOI 10.1007/s10803-009-0834-0

 

Published

Successful implementation of inclusive education: From debate to data

Shukla-Mehta, S.

(pp. 125-136). In M. L. Han Hui, C. R. Dowson, and M. G. Moont (Eds.). Inclusive Education in the New Millennium. Hong Kong: Education Convergence & the Association for Childhood Education International. (Also translated in Chinese.)

 

Published

From hypotheses to interventions: Applied challenges of intervening with escalating sequences of problem behavior.

Shukla-Mehta, S. & Albin, R. W.

The Behavior Analyst Today, 4 (3), 5-21.

 

Published

Twelve practical strategies for preventing behavioral escalation in classroom settings.

Shukla-Mehta, S. & Albin, R. W.

Preventing School Failure, 47 (3), 156-161. [Reprinted by publisher in The Clearing House. A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues, and Ideas (2003), 77 (2), 50-56.]