Educational Leadership Doctorate Info Session - Dallas

Date: 
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm

University Centers at Dallas
1910 Pacific Ave
Dallas, TX 75201


Interested in a doctoral degree in educational leadership? Attend one of our informational sessions.

Educational Leadership Doctorate Info Session - UNT

Date: 
Monday, September 25, 2017 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm

UNT Business Leadership Building


Interested in a doctoral degree in educational leadership? Attend one of our informational sessions.

Counselors receive research grant to study Native populations in New Mexico

By Raquel Talamantes

UNT College of Education Counseling faculty members Amanda Giordano, Elizabeth Prosek and Michael Schmit recently received a research grant from the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) to interview Native Americans and gain a better understanding of how they want their culture to be portrayed in diversity courses and how to best meet the mental health needs of this marginalized population. 

Giordano, a specialist in addictions counseling and co-facilitator of the counseling program’s Addictions Counseling Research Team (ACRT); Prosek, co-facilitator of ACRT and specialist in mental health outcomes; and Schmit, an assistant professor specializing in outcome research, aim to gather information from the Native Americans participating in the study that has not yet been presented in existing research literature..

“We hope to gain new knowledge and understanding of how Native men and women experience counseling, if at all; or how counselors could better serve them,” Prosek said.

The award will provide the opportunity to conduct a qualitative study to inform counselors on ways in which they can provide more culturally sensitive counseling services. Additionally, the interviews will highlight the participants’ opinions about how Native culture should be presented in graduate courses.  

“We will conduct a phenomenological study with Native people, both on and off reservations, in order to ascertain Native Americans’ perspectives of how counselors can best approach the mental health needs of Native clients,” said Giordano, who is leading the study. “Additionally, learning about the lived experiences of Native Americans’ access to higher education may help counselor educators recruit Native people into counselor-training programs. Specifically, we will conduct individual, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with Native Americans on or near reservations in New Mexico.”

Giordano said she believes the most useful insight and direction in studies like this one comes directly from the population being studied, and she wants to give Native Americans a chance to share their voice as it relates to their own culture.

“Statistics continue to highlight mental health and substance abuse needs among this population” Giordano said. “Specifically, alcohol-related deaths are 520 percent higher among Native people than all races in the U.S., and death by suicide is 60 percent higher. Therefore, we believe it is crucial for counselor educators to gain a thorough understanding as to what Native people believe to be the proper treatment for these issues.”

Prosek adds that conducting phenomenological studies through a qualitative approach allows for the voices of the participants to be heard.

Giordano chose Santa Fe, New Mexico, for the study because of its large and diverse Native American population.

“There are 562 distinct Indian nations in the United States,” Giordano said. “It would be erroneous to group all Native people together without considering within-group differences. Therefore, our goal is to ascertain information from individuals from different tribes and Native cultural backgrounds.”

There are eight Native pueblos in northern New Mexico near Santa Fe: Nambe, Picuris, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, Ohkay Owingeh, Tesuque, Santa Clara and Taos. The Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Inc. (ENIPC Inc.) exists to provide tribal governors with a structure to collaborate and meet the needs of their communities, Giordano said.

“We feel that conducting interviews in northern New Mexico provides a unique opportunity to learn from individuals from many tribes,” she said.

Over the past five years, Giordano has dedicated time and effort to promote racial justice and to advocate for marginalized groups. Her initiative to combat oppression and to give voices to those in need led her to apply for the ACES grant and start this study.

“The idea of the grant project originated with Amanda,” Schmit said. “When she asked me to join the team, I felt honored and was excited to contribute my research knowledge to the magnitude of what this project represents — giving a voice to Native people.”

 

Pictured, left to right, Amanda Giordano, Elizabeth Prosek and Michael Schmit.

Barbara Pazey

Associate Professor, Teacher Education and Administration
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Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 218-L
Phone: 
940-565-4897
Email: 
Barbara.Pazey@unt.edu

Cheryl Jennings

Visiting Professor, Teacher Education and Administration
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Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 207-M
Email: 
Cheryl.Jennings@unt.edu

Elizabeth Murakami

Professor, Teacher Education and Administration, Mike Moses Chair in Educational Administration
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Contact Info
Office: 
Matthews Hall 218-H
Phone: 
940-565-2832
Email: 
Elizabeth.Murakami@unt.edu

Dr. Elizabeth Murakami is a distinguished national educator and research fellow, having received national and international recognition for her research contributions. She earned her master’s degree and doctorate in educational administration at Michigan State University. Dr. Murakami has been dedicated to the improvement of Texas schools for more than a decade and has numerous published works that include academic journals, book chapters, creative works and edited books.

COE faculty member helps organize donation of infant sleepers in wake of hurricanes

Hundreds of families affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma will soon be able to rest easier, thanks to a donation of 1,000 Pepi-Pod infant sleep spaces donated by New Zealand-based non-profit organization Change for Our Children and coordinated by UNT College of Education faculty member Wendy Middlemiss.  

Change for our Children Limited, a small social innovation company based in Christchurch, said the Pepi-Pods ensure a safe place to sleep for a baby whatever the disruption to family circumstances.  

“Babies are a particularly vulnerable group in times of natural disaster,” said Change for Our Children director Stephanie Cowan. “Hurricane Harvey has tipped thousands of Texan infants into increased risk of sudden infant death by disrupting living and sleeping conditions for their families. It is harder for parents to provide safe sleeping conditions for their babies when fearful, dependent and displaced.”

Middlemiss, an associate professor of Educational Psychology, has done extensive research on infant sleep safety, in the U.S and in New Zealand. She is working with Michael Garrett, CEO of Texas-based Trusted World, to organize the collection and distribution of the sleepers to families in need. They will be stored and distributed by Harvey Relief Hub, a volunteer-run initiative in Houston.

Each pod will be supplied with a mattress, two bottom sheets and a letter of goodwill from the people of New Zealand to the parents of Texas. A team at Baby First Limited in Christchurch is busy sewing for the project.

“Many people across New Zealand participated in an outpouring of support for Christchurch parents following the 2011 earthquakes, when we initiated a similar response,” said Cowan. “This is a New Zealand response. Hearts melt when it comes to babies. To survive the floods but be lost to a sleep accident is a tragedy we can help prevent in Texas.”

For more information, contact Middlemiss at 724-977-3067 or wendy.middlemiss@unt.edu.

 

Above, a baby sleeps in a Pepi-Pod.

North Texas teachers, students spend summer honing skills

While students were enjoying their break, more than 3,000 teachers used the summer months to improve their craft. Through the National Writing Project (NWP), teachers across the country, including hundreds in North Texas, worked face-to-face and in online communities to share and learn new ways to teach writing, engage colleagues and enhance their leadership.

In Dallas-Fort Worth, the North Star of Texas Writing Project, led by UNT College of Education faculty member Carol Wickstrom, provided professional development for more than 200 teachers and writing camps for more than 500 students. In June, students attended weeklong writing camps to strengthen their writing performance on the state-mandated STAAR test. Using the project’s Finding True North Lesson Frameworks, campers were able to bolster their writing confidence.  

Throughout the summer, teachers attended a variety of events including Invitational Writing Institutes held in Denton, Gainesville, Keller and Waxahachie. Using a writing workshop approach, these teachers received 40 hours of professional development and a set of professional books. Other teachers attended workshops including a Human Rights Institute, Implementing Writing in the Secondary Classroom Workshop, an Advanced Writing Instruction Institute, and an Expository Writing Institute (sponsored by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board) in Mesquite.

“Participating in these writing institutes and workshops supports teachers as they improve their classroom practices to meet their students’ needs,” Wickstrom said. “Their participation in this work helps them grow as educators and learners and provides a gateway into the larger network of teachers, administrators and leaders in NWP. The NWP network is one that continues to support the growth of its members.”

NWP programs serving all 50 states provided classroom teachers deep and broad content and innovative approaches, anchored in improving instruction for today's young people. From collaborative work on argument writing in the NWP College, Career and Community Writers Program (C3WP) to youth programs aimed at sparking student interest and authentic learning experiences, these experiences aimed to get teachers excited to return to classrooms and share what they learned.  

Teachers who attended these NWP programs joined a nationwide professional network of educators (young children through higher education) focused on high-quality, effective and sustained professional development to improve the teaching of writing and learning in classrooms across the country, said Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, NWP executive director.

"NWP teacher leaders work using our evidence-based programs to help their students become better writers and learners," she said. "They also develop their own skills and capacities to work with colleagues to improve education and the profession more broadly.”  

Advancing the national scale-up of NWP’s College, Career and Community Writers Program, 80 local Writing Project sites held Advanced Institutes to provide professional development in middle and high schools serving urban, rural and other high-need communities across the country. The goal of the program is to assure more teachers can support students’ growth in reading and writing skills, with a specific emphasis on writing arguments based on nonfiction texts. In one of the largest and most rigorous studies of teacher professional development, SRI International found that this work has a positive, statistically significant impact on student writing.

Beyond this initiative, the NWP network of local sites, teacher leaders and programs encompass multiple disciplines — English, math, science, art, civics, history — and spaces beyond the classroom: online communities, after-school programs, museums and libraries. Through these partnerships, Writing Project sites extend the reach of their work to dedicated educators developing next-generation curriculum and learning opportunities that support all young people as writers and creators.

"We know through research that programs designed and delivered by NWP sites have a positive effect on the writing achievement of students across grade levels, schools and contexts,” Eidman-Aadahl said. “Now is the time to continue to support this ongoing, high-quality professional development for teachers, principals and school leaders."

Helping Babies Rest Safely After Hurricanes Harvey and Irma

Thousands of families affected by Hurricane Harvey and Irma will soon move into shelters, many with nothing but the few possessions they could salvage. Those with babies face an additional struggle: With no crib, where can parents put their babies to sleep safely?

Wendy Middlemiss, associate professor in the UNT College of Education’s Educational Psychology department, is collecting bassinettes to help these babies and their parents.

Your donation of less than $40 can provide a safe sleeping bassinette for an infant whose family was evacuated from an area impacted by the hurricanes.

“These bassinettes are the perfect size for little babies, and they are safe for co-sleeping if you want to keep your baby close,” says Middlemiss, who has done extensive research on infant sleep safety. “They’re also portable, so parents can move their babies as they sleep.”

Middlemiss hopes to collect 100 bassinettes, which will be delivered to the Dallas Area Shelter Warehouse and distributed to families in need. Your donation will help offset the cost of the sleepers and shipping, and help infants and families in crisis find some peace of mind.

Middlemiss has also helped to coordinate the delivery of 1,000 bassinettes donated from a company in New Zealand to help these babies – and their parents – get a good night’s rest. These Pepi-Pod sleepers were sewn by a team in New Zealand and are due to be delivered to Houston in late September.

Read more about Middlemiss’s infant sleep safety research.

COE faculty receive $313,000 grant to help improve academic performance in local ISDs

Three University of North Texas College of Education faculty members have received a $313,000 grant to help local school children improve academically and achieve mental wellness.

The grant from the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health will support the work of Dee RayNatalya Lindo and Peggy Ceballos, all from UNT’s Department of Counseling and Higher Education. They received the grant to support their project, "Play for the Future: Linking Mental Health to Academic Achievement for Young Children." The three professors will be offering play therapy, parent and teacher education, consultation, and additional initiatives to five schools across Denton and Little Elm during the three years of the grant. 

“We are excited and eager to serve the children and families of Denton County through our partnership with local schools,” said Ray. “Our delivery of play therapy services to children, parents, and teachers in local public schools will be directed toward improving emotional wellness and academic achievement. And we are incredibly grateful to the Hogg Foundation who are committed to the mental health and progress of children.

The Play for the Future project is an initiative of the Center for Play Therapy at UNT, which uses play therapy services as the cornerstone for improving academic and emotional wellness of young children. Play therapy and its adult-related programs have recently been recognized as evidence-based interventions for general functioning, disruptive and internalizing disorders, anxiety, and family cohesion, Ray said. Play for the Future will target schools within the Denton and Little Elm Independent School districts classified by the state of Texas with 64-85 percent economically disadvantaged students and 55-72 percent of the school population as at-risk academically.

 

Pictured, Dee Ray.

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