Lauren Eutsler

Assistant Professor, Teacher Education and Administration
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 206-T
Phone: 
940-565-2539
Email: 
Lauren.Eutsler@unt.edu

Lauren Eutsler, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education and Administration at the University of North Texas, where she began in 2016. She earned her doctorate in 2016 from the University of Florida. Her research focuses on using portable technology to support children’s literacy development and training pre-service teachers to effectively use portable technology to motivate, enhance, and improve children's literacy learning. At UNT, she teaches reading and elementary education courses in the undergraduate program.

Elba Barahona

Lecturer, Teacher Education and Administration
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 206-S
Phone: 
940-565-4853
Email: 
Elba.Barahona@unt.edu

Yolanda Mitchell

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 322-J
Phone: 
940-369-8377
Email: 
Yolanda.Mitchell@unt.edu

Cynthia Frosch

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 322-C
Phone: 
940-369-8369
Email: 
Cynthia.Frosch@unt.edu

Rachel Mun

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 322-B
Phone: 
940-565-2028
Email: 
Rachel.Mun@unt.edu

Amarie Carnett

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 304-I
Phone: 
940-369-7942
Email: 
Amarie.Carnett@unt.edu

DeeAnna Oliveira

College Resource Officer
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Office: 
Matthews Hall 117-U
Phone: 
940-565-2523
Email: 
DeeAnna.Oliveira@unt.edu

Alumna Kristin Farmer honored by Heart of Autism


Kristin Farmer
(’95 M.Ed.), founder of ACES and benefactor of the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center, established in 2012, has received the 2016 Distinguished Service Award from Dallas-area nonprofit organization Heart of Autism. The award will be presented at the Heart of Autism Masquerade Ball Sept. 17 at the Eldorado Country Club in McKinney.

“I am thrilled to receive this honor from Heart of Autism, an organization that shares my passion for helping children and adults on the spectrum live fuller lives,” Farmer said.

Heart of Autism started as a small, grass-roots fundraising group organized by Dallas real estate professional and mom Nika Arastoupour, whose son, Mazy, was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of 2 in 2012. Arastoupour quickly realized that therapy was expensive, and she wanted to do something to help underprivileged families that could not afford autism services. She also wanted to help fund research into ASD – like the research she saw firsthand when her son received treatment at the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center in Denton.

Since its inception in 2013, Heart of Autism has raised more than $70,000. Last year, the organization, which had been focused exclusively on children with ASD, added adult services as part of its mission, which includes therapy as well as job placement assistance.

Farmer graduated from UNT in 1995 and began working with children with ASD in the Virginia Beach public school system. She was soon recognized as an expert in the region for other teachers on how to work with children with autism. After relocating to San Diego, Farmer began her own company providing behavioral intervention services. Today her company, ACES, employs more than 1,000 people and offers multidisciplinary services to individuals with autism across the United States. Farmer is involved with the Young Presidents Organization (YPO), Chi Omega and Girl Scouts. She is a UNT Distinguished Alumna (2010), sponsor of the UNT Art+Autism events held in April, and a member of the UNT Founders Circle.

For more information about the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center, visit autism.unt.edu. For more information about Heart of Autism, contact Nika Arastoupour at Nika@RogersHealy.com or visit heartofautism.org

KHPR chair expanding global impact through leadership and research activities

John Nauright, chair and professor of the UNT Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion and Recreation, has been appointed as inaugural vice president of the World Leisure Sports Association. He will also be the keynote speaker at the organization’s inaugural meetings and conference in Macao in March 2017.

The World Leisure Sports Association is a non-governmental international association established to spread the cultures of leisure sports and to build the leisure sports industry by strengthening international leisure cooperation, which promotes development of leisure sports and the sports tourism industry around the world. An international group of scholars and academic officials from the United States, China, United Kingdom, France, South Korea and beyond have been invited to lead the organization in its research on, and promotion of, leisure sports tourism activities around the world.

The appointment is just one of Nauright’s many international partnerships and speaking engagements.

He was recently named to the Scientific Committee for the World Conference on Science and Football, coming up this spring in Rennes, France. He will also be a featured speaker at the World Ice Hockey Forum in Moscow December 15-17, an event co-hosted by the International Ice Hockey Federation and the Russian Ice Hockey Federation. His talk will examine the growth of ice hockey in new environments with a focus on the Dallas Stars and the growth of hockey in Texas.

Nauright has also been named to the editorial board of the International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics and is in the process of producing a new academic journal, SportsWorld: The Journal of Global Sport. It will launch as a special issue of Sport in Society then as a stand-alone journal in 2017 and will be published by Taylor and Francis, the leading academic publisher globally, and co-edited by Nauright and new KHPR faculty member Steven W. Pope. The journal will be housed at UNT with a world-class global editorial board, Nauright said. 

He has also been named a collaborating research fellow of the Center for Responsible Travel in Washington, D.C., with whom he recently published a study on the impact of climate change on golf tourism in the Caribbean. 

Finally, Nauright has been invited to deliver a keynote address on “Sport and Fitness in the 21st Century City” at the third International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness to be held in Barcelona in May 2017.

UNT’s Adventures in Autism Conference unites professionals, parents

Guests and presenters at the conference included guest speaker Paul Collins (second from left); Keturi Beatty, director of development for the UNT College of Education (center in stripes); Smita Mehta, UNT professor of Educational Psychology (center in black and white); Kristin Farmer, UNT College of Education graduate, founder of ACES (Comprehensive Educational Services Inc.) and benefactor of the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center (back row, behind Mehta); Bertina Combes, interim dean of the UNT College of Education (third from right); Kevin Callahan, executive director of KFAC; and Miriam Boesch, UNT assistant professor of Educational Psychology.

 

By Raquel Talamantes

More than 200 teachers, parents and clinicians ready to learn about new developments and methods in the Autism Spectrum Disorder community gathered at UNT July 30 for the 2016 Adventures in Autism Intervention and Research Conference, organized by the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center.

Bertina Combes, the UNT College of Education’s interim dean, said the university has the expertise and passion needed to make the conference relevant and successful every year. Combes said UNT has also historically responded to the needs of the community.

Smita Mehta, UNT professor of Educational Psychology, leaqds a seminar at the conference.

“I think the increasing number of individuals who have ASD creates a need to examine it more closely, and to investigate not only identification, assessment and intervention strategies, but also ways to support families of individuals with autism with the long-term goal of seamless integration into society,” Combes said. “I think as an institution, one of the oldest and largest in the stat

e founded to prepare teachers, we have a responsibility to the North Texas area to provide quality training for those working with individuals with autism, whether it be through education or through community services. It is our duty and responsibility to be sure that we provide quality training to the individuals and professionals who are going to be providing direct services to kids with autism.”

College professors, researchers and clinicians gathered from across the country to give presentations about what’s new in ASD research and intervention.

Conference speakers this year included Connie Kasari, professor of human development and psychiatry at the University of California; Smita Mehta, professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at UNT; CJ Conard, BCBA-D at Autism Comprehensive Education Services; Lauren Mathews, senior lecturer in Speech Language Pathology at UNT; Paul Collins, professor in the Department of English at Portland State University; and many others.

Kristin Farmer, a UNT College of Education graduate, founder of ACES (Comprehensive Educational Services Inc.) and benefactor of the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center, said she hopes conference attendees were reminded of the importance of research and of helping those affected by ASD — particularly the population that is more severely impacted by the disorder — lead fuller lives.

“I’m hoping that people will gain new knowledge of how to treat autism and gain new ideas or even be reminded of the i
mportance of serving the entire population of autism, from high-functioning to those who are more impacted,” she said.

Kevin Callahan, executive director of the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center, said the conference provides hope for changing lives and making a difference in the futures of families. And Mathews said it unites autism professionals in a meaningful way.

“Interdisciplinary work is so important in this field, and this conference brings together nearly every kind of professional who works with people with autism,” she said. “I just think that’s fantastic. It takes a group to really holistically work with someone with autism, and I feel like this conference embodies that.”

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