Frequently Asked Questions

Project STArT LogoQ: If a scholar is dismissed or drops out of a program for an academic or non-academic reason, will they be required to fulfill the employment or repayment requirement?

Yes. The regulations apply to scholars who are dismissed or drop out of a program in the same manner that they apply to other scholarship recipients (See: Service Obligations for Grant Recipients)

Q: Are there any spots available for Project STArT?

We recruited 21 scholars for the 1st cohort (2014) and recruited another 19 scholars for the 2nd cohort (2015). We are currently recruiting 20 scholars for the 3rd cohort (Fall 2017).

Q: Will any of my Special Education undergraduate courses count for credit in the master's program?

Because this program is a grant funded program, we cannot deviate from the coursework (39 credit hours). So any courses taken as an undergraduate will not count towards our STArT master's program.

Q: Will there be summer courses?

Yes, scholars are expected to take summer courses.

Q: When is the deadline to apply?

The deadline for submission is Tuesday, June 20. Decisions about admission into the 3rd cohort will be made shortly thereafter. Please note that admission into the department does not guarantee admission into Project STArT.

Q: Is it mandatory to enroll full-time throughout the program?

Project STArT is designed to be a rigorous part-time program. Cohort 1 and 2 students will be required to take 6-7 credit hours per regular (spring & fall) semester and 7-9 credit hours in the summer. Cohort 3 students will be required to take 6 credit hours in the fall and spring semesters and 3-6 credit hours in the summer.

Q: Is there any way I could start classes during another semester instead of the fall?

Due to the schedule of courses, all scholars will begin in the fall.

Q: I already have a masters degree but I was not required to take the GRE. Do I need to take it to apply to Project STArT?

The GRE is not required for the Graduate Academic Certificate and as of 2017, the GRE is no longer required for the masters degree.

Q: Does Project STArT have any scholarship awards tied to it?

Yes, scholars will have their full tuition paid.

Q: What type of certificates would I get upon graduation?

In addition to the master's degree, scholars will receive a UNT certificate showing that all Autism Graduate Academic Coursework was completed.

Q: If I want to receive the Autism Intervention Graduate Academic Certificate (GAC-Autism) while completing the master’s program, how do I accomplish this?

You will need to submit a concurrent application to the Graduate School. This can be submitted through the online Concurrent Graduate Academic Certificate form. You will need to apply before you graduate from the master's program. Otherwise, you will not be eligible to receive the GAC after graduation. Upon graduation, UNT will mail the certificate to your home address. It usually takes about 8 weeks.

Q: I'm not a teacher but I work with students who have autism. Am I eligible to apply for this grant program?

Unfortunately, the only eligible candidates are individuals who are responsible for implementing the IEPs of students with disabilities (i.e., teachers).

Q: When will decisions be made as to which students were chosen to be part of the grant program?

Decisions about admissions into grant program will be made by early summer via email. Please note that admission into the department does not guarantee admission into Project STArT.

Q: Is there a hard deadline date for acceptance into the program?

No, but priority will be given to individuals who submit their application prior to any posted deadlines. If there are any vacancies, we will fill those accordingly.

Q: How will I be notified if I am admitted to be part of the grant program?

Individuals will be notified via email shortly after decisions are made.

Q: How many applicants will be accepted into the 3rd cohort?

We will accept 20 scholars from our pool of applicants.

Q: Will all of the courses be offered online?

All of the courses are offered online. However, scholars will also be required to travel to UNT's campus to attend various meetings (usually 1-2 times a semester).

Q: What is considered a "high-needs" school?

The term "high-needs" local education agency (LEA) means that (a) it serves not fewer than 10,000 children from families with incomes below the poverty line; or (b) for which not less than 20 percent of the children served by the LEA are from families with incomes below the poverty line. For the purposes of this priority, the term high-poverty school means: a school in which at least 50 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act or in which at least 50 percent of students are from low-income families as determined using one of the criteria specified under section 1113(a)(5) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended. For middle and high schools, eligibility may be calculated on the basis of comparable data from feeder schools. Eligibility as a high-poverty school under this definition is determined on the basis of the most currently available data (www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/2010-4/121510b.html).  The term persistently lowest-achieving schools is defined according to the final requirements for School Improvement Grants authorized under section 1003(g) of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), which were published in the Federal Register on October 28, 2010 (75 FR 66363). According to Section I.A.3 of these requirements, the term "persistently lowest-achieving schools" means, as determined by the State: [A] Any Title I school in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring that is among the lowest-achieving five percent of Title I schools in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring or the lowest-achieving five Title I schools in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring in the State, whichever number of schools is greater; or is a high school that has had a graduation rate as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b) that is less than 60 percent over a number of years; and [B] Any secondary school that is eligible for, but does not receive, Title I funds that is among the lowest-achieving five percent of secondary schools or the lowest-achieving five secondary schools in the State that are eligible for, but do not receive, Title I funds, whichever number of schools is greater; or is a high school that has had a graduation rate as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b) that is less than 60 percent over a number of years.