Alumni Highlights

 

 

Aaron ShanerAaron Shaner

BS in Kinesiology, 2010

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Exercise Physiology, 2012

Thesis

Shaner, AA, Vingren, JL, Hatfield, DL, Budnar Jr, RG, Duplanty, AA, and Hill, DW. The acute hormonal response to free weight and machine weight resistance exercise. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 1032-1040, 2014

Current Occupation

Physical Ability Testing Project Manager at Advanced Ergonomics, Inc.

I measure the strength, endurance, and agility demands of physically demanding jobs. The data we collect is used to help companies implement a pre-hire functional capacity test that tests an applicant's ability to perform the most physically demanding tasks that they would routinely encounter on the job. Implementation of the test generally results in a decrease in injury rate and an increase in retention for our clients.

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time in the Kinesiology department provided me with the tools to be successful in my future career. The coursework was interesting and the professors were great at explaining the difficult material. At UNT, there are so many opportunities for students to go beyond just showing up for class. I was able to conduct my own study, complete an internship, and work as a teacher fellow. These experiences helped me grow as a learner and apply what I have learned in my classes. My time and experiences at UNT helped prepare me for working in the field of Exercise Science.

Words of wisdom

You can learn a lot from the classes in the program, but I encourage you to take advantage of all the opportunities afforded to you as a UNT graduate student. Participate in studies, work in the lab, work as a teacher fellow, complete an internship or volunteer in the field that you are interested in. Remember that most students in your program will graduate with the same degree as you. What will set you apart from the rest of your peers?

Dana DempseyDana Dempsey

BS in Recreation and Leisure Studies, 1986

MS in Recreation and Leisure Studies, emphasis on Therapeutic Recreation, 1991

Current Occupation

Director, Therapeutic Recreation Department at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children

As a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS), I develop, facilitate and manage therapeutic recreation services and programs for children with disabilities. Some goals include helping the child become more independent, learn activity skills and knowledge develop rewarding relationships, get involved in community recreation programs, and feel a sense of accomplishment.

Reflections on time in KHPR

I am grateful for the education, training, and support given to me by professors at UNT. During the time I was at UNT there were other Universities that offered TR programs, but I chose UNT because I felt the courses would give me a broader context of knowledge and the professors showed dedication to the students and the profession. The successes I have experienced in my career can be directly correlated back to professors who set a high standard for student performance and taught what it meant to be a "professional." Two that stand out in my memory are Drs. Julie Dunn and Jean Keller. I too am grateful for the friends I made during my time at UNT. While college is about classroom learning it is also about helping you grow up, develop socially, and become someone who can make a positive impact on the world around you.

Words of wisdom

1) Make the most of your time at school - both in the classroom and in social settings. They will shape who you become and open future doors.
2) Get to know your professors. Those who are dedicated to students are happy to give meaningful time to your learning.
3) Be willing to go over and above in your studies and career.
4) Remember being a professional also involves giving back and paying forward.
5) Love what you do!

Andrew BlackAndrew Black

BS in Kinesiology, 2010

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Exercise Physiology, 2012

Current Occupation

Physical Ability Testing Project Manager at Advanced Ergonomics, Inc.

I evaluate the strength, endurance, and agility demands of jobs. We use the data collected to design exercise tests for new hire candidates for our clients. The goal of this is to decrease risk of injury and lessen workers' compensation claims.

Reflections on time in KHPR

I feel that my time in the department gave me a great head start for what to expect in a professional setting. The emphasis on accountability for projects and syllabus deadlines, the high volume of group work, and punctuality of class start times are all applicable to the working world.

Words of wisdom

1) Go to class. No professor feels empathy for an empty seat with a failing grade.
2) Visit professors during office hours. Most like to get to know their students and love discussing the material that they teach.
3) Volunteer in whatever field you wish to work in. Almost no one will turn down free labor and it gets your foot in the door after you graduate.

Kenneth G. DuBois IIIKenneth DuBois III

BS in Kinesiology, 2008

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Motor Behavior, 2011

Current Occupation

Physical Ability Testing Project Manager at Advanced Ergonomics, Inc.

It is my responsibility to travel to multiple company locations where there are employees that perform manual labor, and examine the aspects of what they do. I evaluate the demands that are required by the job and record measurements of different tasks that the employee performs while working the job. I then process that data to create tests that will help screen future applicants to make sure they can successfully work at that company performing that job's tasks. By doing this we help companies save money on workers comp claims and prevent injuries for numerous institutions.

Reflections on time in KHPR

I look back on my time spent in the KHPR department and cherish the memories and activities I was a part of. I remember the professors were experts on their craft and wanted to make sure that I learned and absorbed the knowledge to prepare me for the future. No two courses were the same and each offered their own challenging, but rewarding aspects. I discovered that I want to try to teach people how to prevent injuries and live a healthier and safer life. Everything I learned in my undergraduate and graduate time at UNT helped prepare me for the career I am currently a part of.

Words of wisdom

Be active and mindful of what is expected of you! Raise your hand in class, ask questions, participate, engage your professors, take notes, and study! Doing all of these definitely helped me along my road in both undergrad and my graduate studies. Be sure to take your time, don't feel rushed and try your best not to procrastinate. The sooner you complete tasks, the quicker you can move on. In the end, all of your hard work will pay off. Once you graduate keep in touch with your professors and fellow students. It helps to know that you have people in your life who will be there for you to offer advice and just be able to help you if you need it.

Chris SaleChris Sale

BS in Kinesiology, 1997

Current Occupation

Physical Education Teacher at Woodrow Wilson Elementary, Denton, TX

Reflections on time in KHPR

I loved my time at UNT. I struggled mightily at school in the beginning and needed a push in the right direction. It wasn't until I had anatomy and physiology with the infamous Dr. Lott that I finally learned study skills and the effort I would need to put forth to succeed. These lessons came in handy in my KINE classes. I had some great professors in those years including a young Dr. Karen Weiller. She helped me quite a bit when it came to what it meant to be a public school teacher and health professional.

Words of wisdom

BI would tell current and future students in KHPR to enjoy your time and learn as much as you can. You will never be fully ready for what the "real world" has in store, but UNT KHPR will prepare you as well as anyone can.

Megan Self-ReynoldsMegan Self-Reynolds

BS in Kinesiology, 2008

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Special Populations, 2011

Thesis

Self, M., Driver, S., Stevens, L., & Warren, A.M. (2013). Physical activity experiences of individuals living with a traumatic brain injury: A qualitative research exploration. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 30(1), 20-39.

Current Occupation

Clinical Research Coordinator - Trauma, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas

Reflections on time in KHPR

The skills that I gained during my time as a Kinesiology student at UNT have proved essential in my post-graduate life. I appreciate the coursework that prepared me both for my current position researching traumatic injury and beyond. From quantitative analysis to special populations, the KHPR professors worked diligently to provide lessons that were applicable beyond the classroom walls. In addition to the curriculum, the experience that I gained during the process of my thesis project (e.g., study design and implementation, data management, dissemination of results) and as a graduate teaching assistant and teaching fellow gave me a distinct advantage over my peers when I entered the workforce.

Words of wisdom

Go above and beyond the minimum that is required of you. Do not "go through the motions" to simply receive your degree. Volunteer with projects that professors are working on, network with your fellow students, and keep in touch with your professors after graduation. Stay involved as a UNT alum and be proud to be Mean Green!

Anne WoolseyAnne Woolsey

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Health Promotion for Special Populations, 2012

Thesis

Woolsey, A. (2012). Implementing a Physical Activity Centered Education Program for Brain Injury. University of North Texas, Denton, Texas.

Current Occupation

Clinical Research Coordinator for Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation (BIR)

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time as a graduate student afforded a variety of opportunities to grow in the academic, professional, and research field. From the formulation of hypotheses to the preparation of published manuscripts, Dr. Simon Driver, Dr. James Morrow, and Dr. Allen Jackson, provided support for every aspect of the research process. As a result of their guidance, I left UNT with a competitive academic resume. The Research Methods in Physical Activity textbook that now sits on my office desk continues to serve as a resource. However, it is also a reminder of grading rubric nightmares!

Words of wisdom

Make your presence known, volunteer for projects, apply to the teaching fellowship program, and create mutually beneficial relationships with your fellow students and the KHPR academic and administrative staff. It was my experience that if you show a willingness and ambition to learn, you will have the full support from your graduate mentor. Above all else, be kind to Reeca, Barb, and Ellie- they are the heart of the department.

Andrew KantorAndrew Kantor

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Sport Psychology, 2013

Current Occupation

Exercise Coach and Athletic Revolution Co-Manager at Full Throttle Athletics

I lead group exercise classes, which use a variety of implements such as kettlebells, dumbbells, barbells, sandbags, resistance bands, and medicine balls. I also lead classes with kids aged 10-18 to help them with overall athletic development.

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time as a graduate student at UNT means a lot to me. I learned how to think critically, separate good research from bad research, and to locate important findings from any type of research study. Working in the fitness industry, it's not enough to read an article from someone's online blog and accept it as fact. Going to the research and finding out what has a scientific backing, whether it's nutrition or exercise related, is something I need to be able to do to give my clients the best information possible moving forward.

Words of wisdom

I can't emphasize enough how important it is to take advantage of the opportunities you have at your disposal. I spent only 2 semesters as a teaching fellow, but I immediately wished I had tried from the very beginning. The relationships you can build with the professors is amazing, and you'll get a glimpse into the hard work it takes to teach. Above all else, though, it gave me a greater sense of camaraderie with my fellow students in the program and made my final months in the program much more interesting and exciting. Beyond that, do internships, help with research, and go outside of your comfort zone. If all you leave graduate school with is a new piece of paper that says you were there, you will have done yourself a great disservice. Embrace the experience.

Nathan NicholasNathan Nicholas

BS in Kinesiology, 2014

Current Occupation

Coach and Teacher

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time in the Kinesiology department developed me as a professional worker. The workloads were often difficult, but it paid heavy dividends very quickly. I was more qualified than most of the people I was interviewing against in jobs because of the involvement in professional studies, early exposure to the classroom and practicums, as well as overall knowledge gained throughout the program. Specifically in the student teaching portion of my Kinesiology path, it felt never-ending. It's a large amount of work required of you with rigorous due dates. However, it prepared me for the amount of work, paperwork, and preparation that the real world of coaching/teaching for 110+ hours a week requires.

Words of wisdom

Get involved in as much as you can. It's a great way to learn time management and help you develop your passions as well as learn what else it is you're passionate about. Participate in studies that KHPR offers because outside of academia they can be very expensive to experience/partake in. Take care of your studies, but get involved in the campus-life and find lots of things to do! It's great for your resume.

Katie WendlingKatie Wendling

BS in Kinesiology, 2012

Current Occupation

Physical Therapy Doctoral Student, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time in KHPR was highly rewarding and was a major factor in my success at PT school. One facet of the KHPR department that I found unique and beneficial was the simple fact that the professors took time to get to know each student as more than just a student. This established a more vibrant learning environment that allowed me to excel in ways I otherwise might not have. Additionally, I had the unique opportunity to work in the department, which provided me an even closer look at the opportunities KHPR provided for students. Ultimately, I am extremely grateful that I had the chance to be a part of such a wonderful department.

Words of wisdom

Find your passion and put all your energy into it, that way you can never look back and wish you did more. Take advantage of the opportunities presented to you. Life after college can be extremely competitive, and every club or activity you can participate in could make all the difference in the world.

Anthony DuplantyAnthony Duplanty

BS in Kinesiology, 2010

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis on Exercise Physiology, 2012

Current Occupation

NIH-Funded Postdoctoral fellowship on Alcohol/HIV Biomedical Consequences at LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans

I am part of a multi-disciplinary team of scientists collaborating to research the consequences of alcohol abuse on the HIV infected host. As our focus is aimed at conducting translational studies, I work with cell cultures, animal models, and persons living with HIV/AIDS in the clinical setting. My specific focus is in integrating exercise interventions in our studies.

Reflections on time in KHPR

In addition to the great classroom instruction that I received in KHPR, I was very fortunate to become involved in the research projects of the Applied Physiology Laboratory directed by my mentors Drs. Vingren, Hill, and McFarlin. For me, the studying of concepts in the classroom and the application of these concepts in the lab cultivated my understanding of science to a high level. It is great to learn about VO2 Max from a text book, but it really hits home when you conduct VO2 max tests on research participants. Without these opportunities provided by KHPR, I would not have become the scientist that I am now.

Words of wisdom

I started out as most Kinesiology students do, choosing this major because I had an interest in exercise, but no yet knowing what my long term career path would be. As I became immersed in studying the science of exercise I eventually formed two insights about the significance of our discipline:

1) A Kinesiologist is not simply a hobbyist who is enthusiastic about exercise, but a professional who is knowledgeable about the science of exercise. This professional is a much needed commodity in a world where anyone can write books or publish blogs about health and fitness without peer review or scientific validation.

2) Most people in the world believe in the benefits of exercise and are interested in improving their health. However, when a person sets out to learn about how to improve their health/physical fitness through exercise they may become overwhelmed with the litany of conflicting information concerning what is the right nutrition, exercise program, weight loss technique, etc.

My advice is this: Become clear about where you would like to stand as a career professional in Kinesiology. A full biological understanding of humans at rest is far from achieved, much less has been concluded about the effects of exercise. You have two main adversities to work with: a) The answers that exercise science can provide are many, but many more still remain in question, and b) Exponentially larger than the amount of scientific facts about exercise are the opinions and out-of-date misinformation that flood health magazines and websites, which most people have easy access to.

You must be diligent in your efforts to master the information that will be presented to you throughout your degree, and of most importance, you must continue to make a lifelong study of Kinesiology. The continuous contemplation of the knowledge base of exercise science and the diligent studying of new scientific literature are the most important tools you have to becoming a successful and desirable career professional.

The available knowledge-base of our field has radically changed over the past few decades and will continue to refine itself through the next few decades. The health benefits of exercise will play a crucial role in the future of humanity and a Kinesiologist who is up to date with current technologies and science of exercise will be a valuable asset and highly marketable.

Harsh BuddhadevHarsh Buddhadev

MS in Kinesiology, 2011

Current Occupation

Assistant Professor of Kinesiology, Department of Health and Human Development, Western Washington University

Reflections on time in KHPR

The research and teaching experiences and coursework in the Master's program in the KHPR department were pivotal stepping-stones in my academic career. I remember studying hard for the classes and spending many long hours in the research labs. All the hard work paid off, when I got accepted to an excellent doctoral program, which now led to a faculty position. I owe a lot of my success to all the faculty members in the KHPR department, who provided numerous opportunities to get involved in research and challenged me to think critically. I am grateful to Dr. Vingren for mentoring and preparing me well for an academic career.

Words of wisdom

Grab all the opportunities to get involved in research. Your research experiences and the skills you learn will prepare you well and give you an edge over your peers in the workforce. Take advantage of the opportunity to learn from faculty members who are well renowned researchers in the discipline of Kinesiology. Enjoy your time in the KHPR Master's program and make the best of it.

Erin FogartyErin Fogarty

MS in Recreation and Leisure Studies, emphasis on Therapeutic Recreation, 2004

Thesis

Fogarty, E., Hodges, J.S., & Wilhite, B. (2007). Activity patterns of youth with spina bifida. American Journal of Recreation Therapy, 6(3), 19-26.

Current Occupation

Program Specialist II/Recreation Therapist, MHMR Tarrant

As a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS), I support individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in their endeavors to achieve their goals, become involved in their community and enjoy their life, through recreation and leisure activities.

Reflections on time in KHPR

The most impactful part of my experience in KHPR was the support that I received from my professors throughout my time as a graduate student; and this support continues today as a professional. KHPR professors are invested in helping students achieve their potential and contribute to their profession. As a student, I was involved in a collaborative project between UNT and Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, during which I received invaluable, hands-on experience working as a part of a multi-disciplinary team. I participated in the research process first-hand, and this is something I never thought I would do. This experience prepared me to understand the importance of my contribution to the team, and how ultimately it takes many professionals, bringing their unique skills together, to achieve positive outcomes.

Words of wisdom

Your career path may not always take you where you expected it to go, but know that each position that you hold will offer a learning experience that will make you a well-rounded professional. Push your comfort zone and try new and different ideas, work for important things that you're not 100% sure you can achieve, and don't be afraid to fail- this is how you will grow. Throughout your career, take advantage of learning all you can from your clients/customers/the individuals that you serve. You can often learn the most about yourself and what is important when you take time to listen to the viewpoints of others.

Adam VenableAdam Venable

MS in Biology, 2014

PhD in Biology, 2015

Current Occupation

Field Applications Scientist, EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA

I provide scientific support for protein detection and flow cytometry across a very wide range of disciplines in the academic, clinical, and pharmaceutical fields.

Reflections on time in KHPR

My positive experiences in KHPR were rooted in my time in the Applied Physiology Laboratory (APL). The KHPR department has a state-of-the-art research laboratory that is staffed by professors that are well respected, and nationally recognized, in the field of Kinesiology. Under the mentorship of Dr. Brian McFarlin I was able to gain research proficiencies that allowed me to apply what I learned during my time in the classroom as an undergraduate and master's level student. The APL provides the opportunity to transition from a student who reads textbooks to a competent researcher and scientist that writes the research papers that textbooks are based upon.

Words of wisdom

I am not profound in writing words of wisdom. I can communicate what worked for me:

Be engaged. Ask questions. Understand the principles of what you are learning during your time at UNT. Take relevant scientific classes outside of the Kinesiology discipline. Never become complacent... and take breaks. It's okay to take a break from time to time.

Rubin IssacRubin Issac

BS in Kinesiology, 2015

Current Occupation

Doctor of Physical Therapy Student, Texas Woman's University Dallas

Reflections on time in KHPR

By the end of my four years at UNT, I gained much more than just a degree. UNT and the teachers, mentors, and peers that were stationed there radically transformed me. The relationships I developed were at the heart of that change. Professors from KHPR (Dr. Morrow, Master Malone, just to name a few), challenged me, opened doors for me, provided opportunities for me, and educated me inside and outside the classroom. Through the KHPR professors, I experienced a paradigm shift in terms of my education. I no longer saw school as a series of hoops to jump through, but a way to develop my intelligence and cultivate a passion about something I was interested in. This critical, new outlook is something I carry with me even today. Outside of class, memories of developing deep, challenging relationships with mentors and friends also took place within KHPR walls. I still remember meeting with a mentor for weekly discipleship meetings in the study center, talking with friends on the array of couches at the PEB between classes, and braving inclement weather to make it to early morning workouts with peers at the Ken Bahnsen Gym. Memories I cherish and won't soon forget.

Words of wisdom

I have found that these are a few major keys to success in college. It's no surprise that they echo the thoughts of my fellow alumni. Keep them in mind, they can be the difference between an enriching, positive university experience and an empty, squandered one.

  1. It's a balancing act. Buy a planner and use it well. Your organizational skills will be tested.
  2. Don't be a passive bystander in any aspect of your life, be it socially, academically, or spiritually. There is so much growing to be done in all of these respects. Take risks, involve yourself, and embrace opportunity.
  3. There is a difference between memorizing and learning. Memorizing entails regurgitating. Learning entails understanding, applying, and creating. Learn, don't just memorize.
  4. Get involved in an organization or two and relentlessly make friends. Rich relationships are waiting. You'll learn just as much from them as you will in a classroom.
  5. College, among other things, is a highly concentrated region of extraordinary people. Extraordinary people with connections. Develop this valuable network.

Elizabeth MillerElizabeth Miller

BS in Kinesiology, 2015

Current Occupation

Doctor of Physical Therapy student, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Reflections on time in KHPR

I loved the years I spent at UNT in the KHPR department. The skills and knowledge I gained as a kinesiology student well prepared me to be successful as a physical therapy student. I am very grateful for the advice and teaching I received from the department's faculty who each made a great impact on my education. The KHPR faculty were always willing to help you be the best student you could be, so do not hesitate to take advantage of the guidance they offer.

Words of wisdom

Strive to be your best, and get involved at your school and in the community as much as you can. The world is even more competitive after graduation, so I would suggest making time for extracurricular activities that will help you stand out as a job or graduate school applicant and that will grant you a better understanding of your field and what part you want to play in it. Even if you do not plan on applying to PT school, participating and volunteering in different organizations that relate to you degree will make you more unique as an applicant, and it will give your interviewers something else that sets you apart. Above all, love what you do!

Ralph CooperRalph Cooper

BS in Kinesiology, 2014

Current Occupation

Doctor of Physical Therapy student, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time spent at UNT is something that I will always remember as I continue through graduate school and beyond. When I first came to UNT as a transfer student in 2012 it did not take long for me to notice the family atmosphere in the department. It was an environment that not only challenged every student academically, but also helped every student achieve their goals and encouraged students to stop by their offices to ask questions or so they could get to know them better. Getting involved also made my experience great. Working in the KHPR allowed me to continue developing my professional skills and better prepare me for my future career. Along with all that I made a lot of connections and lifelong friends!

Words of wisdom

In your time at UNT be sure to interact with your professors, ask questions, and make those connections that will last beyond your time at UNT. Also, learn as much as you can. The curriculum in place at UNT gives students a distinct advantage in graduate school. Most of my classes in PT school involve a lot of material that was already covered in my undergrad at UNT. So the more you can learn in undergrad the easier your life will be in graduate school. Most of all, have fun, get involved, and study!

Allison MorganAllison Morgan

BS in Kinesiology, 2015

Current Occupation

Doctor of Physical Therapy Student, University of Texas Medical Branch

Reflections on time in KHPR

The time I spent at UNT in the KHPR department put me where I am today. I was taught, challenged, and supported by a faculty that wants all of its students to be successful and excited about the career path they have chosen. Learning and working in the KHPR department prepared me for PT school on an academic and work ethic level.

Words of wisdom

Learn what makes you happy, excited, and calm. Whether you go to grad school or start your career, finding a job that you’re excited about, a hobby that makes you happy, and a way to calm down when you’re stressed is crucial, and these are all things that college allows you to learn about yourself. For me, learning how to manage my time correctly in undergrad is a skill that has been invaluable in PT school when I’m trying to remain calm, cool, and collected during exams and practicals.

Thomas J. Patrey IIThomas J. Patrey II

BS in Kinesiology, emphasis in Athletic Training, 2014

Current Occupation

Athletic Trainer at Orthopaedic and Sports Therapy Center, Wichita Falls, TX

Reflections on time in KHPR

My time spent in the KHPR department is something that I will never forget. In addition, I was a part of the UNT Athletic Training Internship Program working with the football and women’s basketball teams. Throughout my undergraduate career, the KHPR department has facilitated the development of my success as a student and as a professional. I am very appreciative of the faculty and the education and life lessons they have given me throughout my Kinesiology courses. I have made many lifelong friends along the way and have had many great mentors from this department. My favorite memory from UNT was getting the opportunity to travel with the sports teams and be on the road with my colleagues, who I now call my friends. This is a special thing to be a part of on the UNT campus and I am proud to be an Alumnus from the University of North Texas and the Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation Department!

Words of wisdom

Life is too short. Don’t spend all your time studying and preparing for exams or presentations. College is the best time of your life. Remember to take some time for yourself and have a little fun. GO MEAN GREEN!

Mitch BartonMitch Barton

MS in Kinesiology, emphasis in Sport Psychology, 2013

PhD in Educational Psychology, emphasis in the Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise, 2016

Current Occupation

Evaluation Analyst for Dallas Independent School District

I am responsible for designing, monitoring, and implementing program evaluations to help Dallas ISD make informed decisions about their district initiatives. My daily responsibilities can range from meeting with program managers, designing evaluation plans, creating survey items, collecting data, managing large datasets, reviewing research proposals, writing final reports, etc.

Reflections on time in KHPR

During my time at UNT, I had the opportunity to collaborate with students and faculty across several disciplines within KHPR. In addition, working as a teaching fellow provided me with the opportunity to teach in the department and to learn a wide range of research skills. These experiences challenged me each semester to improve as both a student and a researcher. I graduated from UNT knowing that I had the skills to address real-world problems and to overcome any challenges that I face.

Words of wisdom

First, the most important skill for being successful in college is going to class every day and being prepared before you walk into the classroom. This is the foundation of everything that you will do.

Second, if you are interested in a career in Kinesiology, find a way to get involved in the department as soon as possible during your college career. There are a lot of opportunities to work with amazing faculty and students.

Lastly, everyone has those moments during the semester when you will feel overwhelmed. Seek out other students who can support you. Two or more is stronger than one!